Real-time monitoring of current Belg season in Ethiopia

Diego Pedreros, Diriba Korecha, and Chris Funk

Background

Ethiopia experiences three climatic seasons, with high rainfall during two major rainy seasons. The country’s economy is largely agrarian, in which pure farming, mixed farming, and livestock herding (pastoralists) are common practice. Consistent increases in population, over-exploitation of natural resources such as natural forest and swampy lands for agriculture, and well as an alarming expansion of urbanization impose untenable burdens on Ethiopia’s social and economic strata. The agricultural sector in particular supports 85% of the population and thus is central to the livelihoods of the rural poor in Ethiopia (Conway et al. 2007; Deressa 2006). Current agricultural and herding practices in the country mainly rely on seasonal rainfall and water available in perennial rivers and dams; only a small fraction of Ethiopian agriculture is irrigated.  A significant decline in annual agricultural production has been observed during drought years (Lemi 2005).

It has been documented that food shortage and scarcity of water have led to local and nationwide famines, mainly due to complete or partial failures of short (Belg, February-May) and long (Kiremt, June-Sep) rainy seasons over various parts of Ethiopia (NMSA, 1996). The failure of seasonal rainfall is often caused by either misplacement or weakening of large-scale seasonal rain-producing systems. Stephanie et al. (2016) documented that droughts and famines, such as the socio-economic catastrophe of 2011, call attention to the need for reliable seasonal forecasts for rainfall in Ethiopia to allow for agricultural planning and drought preparations.

Drought-related famine is the result of several factors, where lack of rainfall is only the first (Webb et al. 1992). Famine, in itself, cannot be taken as evidence of drought, while it is also not possible to assess the role of societal conditions without knowledge of the extremeness of rainfall deficits (Viste et al, 2013). To address this quandary, some scholars (Funk et al. 2008; Williams and Funk 2011) have documented rainfall declines in southern and eastern Ethiopia, especially in the spring season.

Dry Belg seasons affect all of Ethiopia, causing the largest relative precipitation deficits in the south, where it is the main rainy season. The southern and southeastern lowlands have been drier than normal in every year from 1998 through 2010, with 2009 having the worst drought incidences. This description considers normal as being the average if rainfall over the years 1981-2010. For instance, Viste et al. (2013) noted that even though both the Belg and Kiremt seasons were dry in both 1984 and 2009, the large-scale patterns reflect the fact that in 1984 the Kiremt was one of the driest seasons, whereas the Belg was particularly dry in 2009. The core of the 2009 drought was located farther south, covering the Horn of Africa and the northern part of East Africa, where the February–May season is the main rainy season.

Belg as the main rainy season over south and southeast Ethiopia

While Kiremt is the main rainy season in many parts of Ethiopia, and Belg rains contribute about two-thirds of the annual rainfall for the southern and southeastern Ethiopia (Figure 1). For the Belg season, precipitation shows strong variability and is less reliable both from a temporal and spatial viewpoint, especially over the northern half of Ethiopia.

Percentage contribution of Belg rainfall for annual rainfall totals
Figure 1: Percentage contribution of Belg rainfall for annual rainfall totals

The Belg rains start falling over southern Ethiopian in February. During a wet year, rain usually starts around mid-January and continues without prolonged dry spells through February over Belg growing regions as well as Belg rain-benefiting regions of Ethiopia (Figure 2).

Spatial distribution of February mean rainfall climatology in mm
Figure 2: Spatial distribution of February mean rainfall climatology in mm

In March (Figure 3), Belg rains start to expand north and eastwards and cover the southwest to northeast regions of the Rift Valley. The western and eastern escarpment of the Rift Valley regions also receive rains. Much of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People’s Region (SNNPR), the central and eastern half of Oromia, and the eastern Amhara regions usually receive more rainfall than other parts of the country.

Spatial distribution of March mean rainfall climatology in mm
Figure 3: Spatial distribution of March mean rainfall climatology in mm

Belg rains reach their peak in April (Figure 4), particularly over the regions where Belg is the main rainy season as well as secondary rainy season (over south-southeast, central, east and northeast Ethiopia). Aside from those regions, Belg rains extend eastward and covers the Somali region, where Belg is the main rainy season. In many cases, severe droughts happen when April rains fall short of their predicted climatological values.

Spatial distribution of April mean rainfall in mm
Figure 4: Spatial distribution of April mean rainfall in mm

May is the last month of Belg season (Figure 5), when rain starts to retreat/decline, slowing from eastern and southern sectors of Ethiopia. In contrast, Kiremt seasonal rains further expand west and northwards. Sometimes, Belg and Kiremt seasons merge during a fast transition from El Nino (Belg) to La Nina (Kiremt) or El Nino (Belg) to neutral (Kiremt) episodes.

Spatial distribution of May mean rainfall climatology in mm
Figure 5: Spatial distribution of May mean rainfall climatology in mm

Homogeneous regimes of Belg season

In Ethiopia, onset and cessation of seasonal rainfall vary considerably within a few kilometers distance due to altitudinal variations as well as orientation of mountain chains and their physical influence on atmospheric flow. In particular, diverse topography and strong seasonal variation over the country indicate the potential physical justifications to delineate rainfall patterns on various spatial scales. Based on existing evidence, rainfall seasonality, and above all by considering localized social and economic practices, we delineated the country into four homogeneous regimes. The characteristic of each homogeneous regime is mainly a reflection of their typical seasonal agro-climatic practices as well as the contribution and benefit of seasonal rainfall that prevails in each regime (Figure 6).

Homogeneous regimes of Belg season in Ethiopia
Figure 6: Homogeneous regimes of Belg season in Ethiopia

Social and economic description of homogeneous regimes

  • Purple area (Regime I): This regime receives 40-70% of the total annual rainfall during February, March, April, and May, with rainfall maxima occurring from late March to mid-May), a variety of grain crops (maize, sorghum, teff, barley), root crops (potatoes), pasture, and water storage are commonly practiced over various portions of the region. Most parts of this region are identified as pastoralist.
  • Green area (Regime II): Belg is the second rainy season and contributes 30-50% to annual rainfall totals. These regions usually receive less rainfall compared to southern Ethiopia despite the fact that they rely on Belg rains to produce short-cycled crops, root crops, land preparation for long-cycle crops, pasture, and water storage.
  • Blue area (Regime III): This regime receives up to 30% of their annual rainfall totals from Belg rainfall. Belg rains usually fall from March and continue without prolonged dry spells up to October/mid-November. Belg rains especially contribute to land preparation, planting/sowing of long-cycle (18 dekads) crops (e.g., maize, sorghum), and to contribute for extension of long rainy season that usually spans from March to November.
  • White area (Regime IV): Most parts of these regions receive less than 20% of annual rainfall totals from Belg rainfall because Kiremt is the major rainy season here, although it rains from mid-April/May to September/October.

 

The 2017 Belg Season up to the 2nd dekad of April

Up to the second dekad of April 2017 (to April 20th), the south eastern part of Ethiopia has received a low percentage of the expected rainfall.  See Figure 7.

Rainfall Percent anomalies (1st of February- 20th of April) for the 2017 season.
Figure 7: Rainfall Percent anomalies (1st of February- 20th of April) for the 2017 season.

On a regional level, we examined Regime 1 as shown on Figure 6.  At the end of dekad 2 of April 2017, this region overall had received below average rainfall. Figure 8 shows the seasonal rainfall accumulation for the entire Regime 1 region.  The black line shows how the overall rainfall for the region for the 2017 season deviates from the long term mean (thick red line). This season has received exceptionally low rainfall. The current total (~80 mm) is only 57% of the long term average (~140 mm). Only 3 out the 36 prior had lower seasonal totals, making this season a 10th percentile event – a one-in-ten-year drought if current conditions persist.

Seasonal cumulative rainfall for Regime 1 for every year since 1981 to 2017. Black line represents the development of the 2017 season, red thick line shows the long term mean.
Figure 8: Seasonal cumulative rainfall for Regime 1 for every year since 1981 to 2017. Black line represents the development of the 2017 season, red thick line shows the long term mean.

WRSI for grasslands

The low rainfall during the season in Regime 1 translates into low soil moisture availability for plants.  Figure 9 shows the WRSI for grasslands at the 2nd dekad of April.  By this dekad only a few areas have received enough rainfall for the WRSI model to start. We have been monitoring polygon 1 in southern Ethiopia as shown in Figure 9.  This polygon showed signs of stress, based on WRSI values, since the last dekad of March and exhibited no signs of recovery by the 2nd dekad of April.

The WRSI model show that just a few areas have received enough rainfall to support grasslands and some of these areas are already showing stress, as shown in Polygon 1.
Figure 9: The WRSI model show that just a few areas have received enough rainfall to support grasslands and some of these areas are already showing stress, as shown in Polygon 1.

Looking in more detail into Polygon 1, Figure 10 shows the seasonal cumulative rainfall for every year since 1981 using CHIRPS data. The black line represents the 2017 season, the thick red line shows the long term average, and the two black squares on the axis represent the 33rd and 67th percentiles. The plot shows that the season started as normal, but by the 1st dekad of March rainfall values started to decrease and have not recovered since.     The current total (~120 mm) is only 60% of the long term average (~200 mm), and we see that this season’s total to date is also associated with a one-in-ten-year drought, if the current dryness continues.

Spatially averaged seasonal cumulative rainfall for every year since 1981 for polygon 1. Black line depicts the development of the 2017 season to the 2nd dekad of April.
Figure 10: Spatially averaged seasonal cumulative rainfall for every year since 1981 for Polygon 1. Black line depicts the development of the 2017 season to the 2nd dekad of April.

Figure 11 shows the ensemble of potential outcomes for Polygon 1 based on the observed cumulative rainfall to the 2nd dekad of April, completing the season with historical CHIRPS data for each year. The red line shows the long term average, the black squares show the 33rd and 67th percentiles of the historical data while the red dot is the average of the ensemble. The green triangles represent 1 standard deviation (+) or (-) from the ensemble’s average. The outlook table on Figure 11 shows the probability at the end of the season.  This results indicates that there is a 94% probability that the seasonal accumulation for polygon1 is below normal.    Looking at the ±1 standard deviation range shown in Figure 11, the likely outcomes range from near normal to extremely dry. The most likely outcome, described by the mean of the ensemble, is a total of about 270 mm, or 77% of the long term average.

Potential outcomes based on the observed data to the 2nd dekad of April 2017 and completing the season with original data from each year. The side table show that there is a 94% chance that the seasonal total would be below normal.
Figure 11: Potential outcomes based on the observed data to the 2nd dekad of April 2017 and completing the season with original data from each year. The side table show that there is a 94% chance that the seasonal total would be below normal.

Conclusion

Low rainfall during the Belg 2017 season has been observed since the beginning of March.  These low values in rainfall have been affecting the availability of water for crops and grasslands primarily in southern and southeastern Ethiopia. This analysis focuses on a specific area in southern Ethiopia where the conditions are getting worse as the season progresses.  Even though there is more than a month to the end of the season, there is a 94% probability that the season ends below normal for this region. Substantial (75% of normal) rainfall deficits seem likely, and given the ensemble of historical outcomes, very low seasonal rainfall totals are quite possible.

References

Conway, D., L. Schipper, M. Yesuf, M. Kassie, A. Persechino, A., B. Kebede (2007). Reducing vulnerability in Ethiopia: addressing the issues of climate change: Integration of results from Phase I. Norwich: Overseas Development Group, University of East Anglia.

Deressa, T. T. (2006). Measuring the economic impact of climate change on Ethiopian agriculture: Ricardian approach. CEEPA Discussion Paper No. 21. Pretoria: University of Pretoria (http://econ.worldbank.org).

Lemi, A. (2005). Rainfall probability and agricultural yield in Ethiopia. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review, 21(1): 57-96.

NMSA (1996), Climatic and agroclimatic resources of Ethiopia, Natl. Meteorol. Serv. Agency of Ethiopia, Meteorol. Res. Rep. Ser., 1(1), 1–137.

Webb P, Braun Jv, Yohannes Y (1992). Famine in Ethiopia: policy implications of coping failure at national and household levels. Research Reports, vol 92. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

Funk C, Dettinger MD, Michaelsen JC, Verdin JP, Brown ME, Barlow M, Hoell A (2008). Warming of the Indian Ocean threatens eastern and southern African food security but could be mitigated by agricultural development. PNAS 105:11081–11087

Stephanie Gleixner, Noel Keenlyside, Ellen Viste,  Diriba Korecha (2016):  The El Niño effect on Ethiopian summer rainfall. Clim Dyn, DOI 10.1007/s00382-016-3421

Viste, E, Korecha, D. and Sorteberg, A. (2013): Recent drought and precipitation tendencies in Ethiopia. Theoretical & Applied Climatology. V. 112, p535-551

 

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